Scroll down after reading the introductory paragraphs for information on specific courses and curricula.

 

This list is not exhaustive. Please read the information on this page before continuing.

 

 


Acceptable High-School Courses and Curriculum

>>>Scroll down after reading the introductory paragraphs for information on specific courses and curriculum.

This list is not exhaustive. Please read the information on this page before continuing.

Introduction to Assigning Credits and Choosing Curriculum for High-School Students
(See also our High-School Guidelines)

Our goal in reviewing courses and curriculum on educational plans and grade reports is to ensure that the courses on Gateway's academic transcripts are complete and comprehensive so that students appropriately respresent both home education and Gateway Christian Schools to potential colleges/universities/schools and other institutions. We desire to create credible transcripts for students who transfer or graduate from Gateway's home-education program. Gateway maintains a conservative approach to credit assignments (since we only require 22 credits), so we do not accept every course that other, more liberal, schools might allow. Some parents may find it confusing to understand what courses and what curriculum are accepted by Gateway for high-school credit. This list is a result of our desire to help parents choose appropriate courses and teaching materials for their high-school students. This list is (and always will be) incomplete since there are so many options for choosing curriculum, but the curriculum listed here is accepted at Gateway.

Many parents may choose to use a variety of materials and will not find the books they choose listed below. It is acceptable (and even encouraged) for Gateway families to pick and choose different books to design a curriculum that is suitable for each individual student. Still, parents must understand the parameters of each high-school course and choose books accordingly. For instance, a parent who desires to teach a high-school level Ancient History course may use a variety of high-school level books to teach the course, but must be sure to include a time period from early civilizations to about the 1500's and must title the course "Ancient History" instead of "Social Studies" or "From Creation to the Dark Ages." Of course, Ancient History should include a study of the world from early civilizations to the 1500's, not just a particular region or civilization.

Though some curriculum may be very in-depth, in order to earn high-school credit, the course must cover the content that would be covered in a traditional high-school level course. For instance, a U.S. History course must cover Pre-Colonial times to modern day America. It is not sufficient for a partial study of U.S. History (e.g. Civil War History) to earn high-school credit, regardless of how much time is spent on the limited portion. It is not appropriate to use non-high-school level materials to teach a high-school level course. We do our best to review each educational plan when we receive it with the application at the beginning of the year, but ultimately, we consider it the parents' responsibility to ensure that a high-school course follows traditional standards needed to earn high-school credit.

Click here to access the list of acceptable high-school courses if you have read this introduction and understand that the list is not exhaustive/complete.

 

   
   

 

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